Final Option, The

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The Final Option (1982)
Who Dares Wins (1982)

The Final Option (Original British Title: Who Dares Wins) is a 1982 action film directed by Ian Sharp (The Professionals) and starring Lewis Collins, Judy Davis, with Edward Woodward and Richard Widmark. Producer Euan Lloyd (The Wild Geese, Shalako) was so inspired by the storming of the Iranian embassy by Britain's Special Air Service in 1980 (an event Lloyd watched live in person and was later dramatized in the 2017 film 6 Days), he immediately got the ball rolling on a film about the SAS. Filming was done with the full cooperation of the SAS and the British Army and several sequences closely model the embassy operation. Lewis Collins, who stars as Captain Skellen, had actually passed SAS selection at one point, but was ultimately rejected due to his fame. This film also featured one of the earliest appearances of the Heckler & Koch MP5.


The following weapons were used in the film The Final Option:

Contents


Heckler & Koch MP5A3

SAS troopers are armed with Heckler & Koch MP5A3 submachine guns. All of the MP5's seen are fitted with "slimline" handguards and the original straight "waffle" magazines. (During the actual embassy operation, photos of the real-life incident show that the SAS troopers' MP5s were fitted with the curved 30-round magazine that is now standard.)

Heckler & Koch MP5A3 with original "slimline" handguard and straight "waffle"-style magazine - 9x19mm
An SAS trooper standing guard at the entrance to Stirling Lines.
SAS troopers practice assaulting a building.
Captains Freund and Hagen are armed with MP5s as they talk to Major Andy Steele (Maurice Roeves).
SAS troopers storm a rail car during a training exercise.
SAS troopers storm the U.S. Ambassador's residency
Armed with MP5A3's, SAS troopers clear rooms with Flash Bang stun grenades

Browning Hi-Power

SAS troopers are shown using Browning Hi-Power pistols.

Browning Hi-Power "Type 73" - 9x19mm. These Hi-Powers feature elongated bushings different from Hi-Powers Made before 1973 and after the MK II Series.
An SAS trooper begins to dissemble a Hi-Power under the instruction of Trooper Neil (Stephen Bent).
An SAS trooper loads his Hi-Power before breaching Skellen's Mews.
Now with a round chambered.

L1A1 SLR

SAS troopers and Captains Hagen (Bob Sherman) and Freund (Albert Fortell) carry L1A1 SLR rifles during their field exercise in Wales.

British Inch Pattern L1A1 SLR (Self Loading Rifle) chambered in 7.62x51mm NATO - Variation of the FN FAL rifle. British & New Zealand SLR's were later fitted with black fibreglass furniture as seen here.
SAS troopers with SLRs before the training exercise in Wales.
Trooper Williamson (Nick Brimble) and Captain Skellen (Lewis Collins) hold SLR's.
Captain Skellen (Lewis Collins) with his SLR.

MAC-10

Most of the terrorists are armed with MAC-10 submachine guns. Some of them are fitted with suppressors. In the dialogue, they are described as being chambered in "9mm."

Ingram MAC-10 open bolt submachine gun - .45 ACP
Helga (Ingrid Pitt) demonstrating a MAC-10.
The trainees fire their MAC-10s.
A suppressed MAC-10 is held by one of the terrorists.
Skellen (Lewis Collins) performing what may be a cinematic first: firing a MAC-10 using the iron sights.
Skellen (Lewis Collins) holds the MAC-10 as he searches the embassy.
Skellen (Lewis Collins) actually doing on film what video games had long assumed all along: taking ammo from a dropped gun. Being an open-bolt weapon, the MAC-10 only needs to have its magazine removed to completely unload the weapon--the chamber does not need to be checked and emptied as with a closed-bolt weapon.
Skellen (Lewis Collins) opens fire with the MAC-10.

Beretta M12

Frankie Leith (Judy Davis) and Rod Walker (John Duttine) are armed with Beretta M12 submachine guns.

Beretta PM12S - 9x19mm.
Frankie hijacks the bus.
Beretta M12 on left.
What? It's an elegant dinner party! Frankie Leith (Judy Davis) armed with Beretta M12 submachine gun.
Rod Walker (John Duttine) are armed with Beretta M12 submachine gun.

Tokagypt 58

Rod Walker and Mac (Mark Ryan) are armed with Tokagypt 58 pistols.

FEG Tokagypt 58 - 9x19mm parabellum.
Rod shoots a Marine guard.
The Tokagypt grips can be seen in this shot. Note that the hammer is down, despite having just been fired.

Smith & Wesson Model 10

Helga uses a snub-nosed Smith & Wesson Model 10 during the kidnapping of Skellen's family.

Smith & Wesson Model 10 snub nose revolver - .38 Special.
Helga with her S&W Model 10.
The S&W Model 10 on the table.

Remington 870

An SAS trooper uses a Remington 870 shotgun to breach a door.

Remington 870 Police Folder with extended magazine tube - stock extended - 12 Gauge
The Remington 870 slung on the back of an SAS trooper as they board their Westland Scout helicopters.
FinalOption 870 02.jpg
An SAS breacher shoots out the hinges of the strong front door. The long magazine pouches on his belt suggest that he's also carrying an MP5 as well.

L7 Machine Gun

An L7 Machine Gun machine gun is seen mounted on a Land Rover at the SAS training facility.

British L7A2 General Purpose Machine Gun - 7.62x51mm NATO
FinalOption GPMG 01.jpg

XM177

Trooper Baker (Ziggy Byfield) uses an XM177 during a training exercise.

Colt Model 609 aka U.S. Army's XM177E1- 5.56x45mm. This Carbine utilized the partial magazine fence, the tear drop forward assist, but kept the 10" barrel and Flash hider/Suppressor that did not have a grenade ring (a later feature on the E2 model).
"Live bastards! Dead soldiers!"

Federal Gas Riot Gun

Two SAS troopers suspended from a helicopter fire grenades from a Federal Gas Riot Gun.

Federal M201-Z - 37mm. Upgrade from the L-5, the M201Z has a secondary ladder sight behind the latch and the barrel is ringed for a sling swivel. The L-5 has a plain smooth barrel.
It may look a little silly, but they swing straight into the building right after blowing out the windows with the grenade launcher.

Schermuly Training Grenade

The SAS troopers have Schermuly Training Grenades on their webbing. The body of the grenade is plastic with an open bottom with the interior filled with a paper wrapped pyrotechnic charge. Once the lever was released there was a two second delay before this charge was propelled out the base of the grenade and exploded about half a second later. Although, as the name implies, it was originally intended as a training grenade it was found it could also be used as a stun grenade so its appearance on an SAS troopers webbing, particularly in the early 80s, is legitimate.

Schermuly Training Grenade
An SAS trooper with a Schermuly Training Grenade on his webbing as the Westland Scouts fly them to the American Embassy.



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