K-9

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K-9 (1989)

K-9 is a 1989 action comedy starring James Belushi as Michael Dooley, a San Diego police detective who reluctantly partners up with a drug sniffing canine named "Jerry Lee" in order to take down a drug lord who has targeted him for elimination. The film was released only three months prior to the similarly-plotted Tom Hanks action comedy Turner & Hooch. The success of K-9 would spawn two DTV sequels: K-911 (1999) and K-9: P.I. (2002).

The following weapons were used in the film K-9:

Contents



Handguns

Beretta 92SB

San Diego Police Department Detective Michael Dooley (James Belushi) carries a Beretta 92SB with wood grips as his primary weapon in this movie. The handgun is most prominently seen when Dooley lays his gun on the hospital tray table. In one scene, he mentions to "Jerry Lee", his new German Shepherd partner, that he's going to pull out his "revolver". (How do you mistake a Beretta 9mm for a revolver?!!)

Beretta Model 92SB with wood grips - 9x19mm.
Detective Michael Dooley (James Belushi) draws his Beretta 92SB during a standoff.
Dooley with his Beretta on the rooftop. Here, the rounded trigger guard is visible.
Dooley with his (empty) Beretta.
Dooley shows his Beretta.
Dooley lays his gun on the hospital tray table.

Beretta 92F

A Beretta 92FS is briefly seen drawn by San Diego Police during the standoff.

Beretta 92F - 9x19mm
A Beretta 92FS is briefly seen drawn by San Diego Police during the standoff.


Smith & Wesson Model 39

Lyman (Kevin Tighe) uses a 9mm Smith & Wesson 39 in polished nickel. He uses it first to hold Dooley's wife, Tracie (Mel Harris) at gunpoint, and again to shoot Jerry Lee (the dog in the film). When Dooley says the line "You think this is a Nine Millimeter mistake?", he wasn't kidding.

Smith & Wesson Model 39-2, nickel finish - 9x19mm
Lyman (Kevin Tighe) uses a 9mm Smith & Wesson 39 in nickel finish to hold Dooley's wife, Tracie (Mel Harris) at gunpoint.

Smith & Wesson Model 14

Throughout the film, uniformed officers of the San Diego PD can be seen wearing and aiming Smith & Wesson Model 14 revolvers. Contradictions state that the guns are really Model 27s, but examination of the barrel reveals it is really a .38 Model 14.

Smith & Wesson Model 14 - .38 spl

Smith & Wesson Model 19

Lieutenant Byers (James Handy) carries a 4-inch Smith & Wesson Model 19 in his hip holster.

Smith & Wesson Model 19 Combat Magnum - .357 magnum
Lieutenant Byers (James Handy) carries a 4-inch Smith & Wesson Model 19 in his hip holster.

Smith & Wesson Model 686

Other officers are armed with the Smith & Wesson Model 686.

S&WModel686.jpg
Other officers are armed with the Smith & Wesson Model 686.

SIG-Sauer P226

Other officers are seen armed with the SIG-Sauer P226.

SIG-Sauer P226 - 9x19mm
Other officers are seen armed with the SIG-Sauer P226.

Shotguns

Ithaca 37

Other officers are seen armed with the Ithaca 37.

Ithaca Model 37 riot version - 12 Gauge
Other officers are seen armed with the Ithaca 37.

Benelli M1 Super 90

A Benelli M1 Super 90 appears to be used by the truck driver to try and take out Dooley's car.

Benelli M1 Super 90 with ghost ring sights - 12 Gauge
A Benelli M1 Super 90 appears to be used by the truck driver to try and take out Dooley's car.

Submachine Guns

Heckler & Koch MP5A3

A thug is seen armed with a Heckler & Koch MP5A3.

Heckler & Koch MP5A3 - 9mm.
A thug is seen armed with a Heckler & Koch MP5A3.

Micro Uzi

A suspect is seen armed with a Micro Uzi.

Micro Uzi - 9x19mm
A suspect is seen armed with a Micro Uzi.

Uzi

Dillon (Sherman Howard) is armed with a full size Uzi.

IMI Uzi - 9x19mm
Dillon (Sherman Howard) is armed with a full size Uzi.

Machine Guns

M60

An M60 can be seen firing from a helicopter to shoots and blows up Dooley's car.

M60 machine gun with bipod folded - 7.62x51mm NATO
An M60 can be seen firing from a helicopter to shoots and blows up Dooley's car.

See Also

K-9 Film Franchise
K-9 (1989)  •  K-911 (1999)  •  K-9: P.I. (2002)



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