Talk:Mad Max

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Hope no one...

...will delete image of airsoft replica i recently uploaded here and on a sequel page, considering that original shotgun remains unidentified and it's far better to have a picture of something designed after original props then random sawn-off shotgun don't it? --Kloga 00:20, 20 January 2011 (UTC)

Rem 870 or Moss 500?

Max carries a Remington 870 when he and Jim Goose inspect the aftermath of the attacked couple.

Remington 870 Police Magnum Riot Shotgun - 12 gauge
Madmax shotgun.jpg
Madmax shotgun2.jpg

Looking at how the forend doesn't go all the way up to the front of the magazine tube I'm thinking Mossberg 500? --Predator20 04:12, 29 August 2009 (UTC)

Mossberg500.jpg
Mossberg 500 wooden.jpg

I think Predator20 is right. --Mauser 03:42, 16 October 2009 (UTC)

The first screencap, when they find Johnny and the girl, looks like Goose has a Model 28 drawn. --Maxman 16:36 2 January 2013 (EST)

Model 28?

This revolver doesn't look like a Model 28. It has fixed sights. Rafa.

Bubba takes aim at Max's left knee.
That is a weird specimen. It appears to have the Baughman front ramp sight and the ejector rod lug. I have to say that it is definitely a S&W N frame and the cylinder looks like it's a 44 caliber cylinder. Also the barrel appears not to have the distinctive taper shape that you see with the 38/357 N frames or the 44 special N frames. Plus the bore looks to be larger than the 38/357.
From that one screencap all I can guess is that it's some type of parts or hybrid revolver made up from one of the S&W Military (fixed sights) 44 N frames with the heavy 44 magnum barrel put on it. Now this is an Australian movie and it's my understanding that the Australians have a very strong custom gun industry. Even before the gun grabbing craze of the mid-90's I understand that it was always difficult and expensive for Australian gun-owners to get hold of new U.S. made handguns (Australians please weigh in here) so they've become very adept at adapting what they have to meet their needs. Whereas American gunowners might go to a custom shop or just buy another model that meets some required or percieved need. Perhaps we're looking at one of those type of revolvers and it found it's way into the movie. But I need a better screencap and I don't own this movie.--Jcordell 14:43, 21 January 2011 (UTC)

I'm not sure the cylinder even revolves. Max Deployment (talk) 16:00, 7 June 2015 (EDT)

Wasn't is awesome...

...when movies had shoe string budgets and had to rely on quality actors and scripts, instead of expensive special effects, to be good? Spartan198 (talk) 05:17, 10 February 2013 (EST)

That's what made the Post Apocalypse genre so popular. Because even in the genre itself you have to be "shoe-string" to even survive a post-nuclear or post-disaster world. I really think this film and the entire franchise is a real piece of art that deserves ALOT more credit and more light. Mad Max has really coined the post-apoc theme and without it then other followers like Wasteland and Fallout and many other films would have not existed. The bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki really did brought out new changes for better and worse (Mostly worse).-The Gunslinger 3 (talk) 00:11, 1 September 2013 (EDT)

What, exactly, do Hiroshima and Nagasaki have to Mad Max? Maxman (talk) 1:03 23 September 2013

New info on Max's sawn-off

From a friend of a friend:

"As for the shotgun, in my research I found that Australia was importing these Spanish made shotguns during the '70s and early '80s. The distinctive feature is the thin white ring that is in the bottom of the handle. This is standard to the ZH (Zabala Hermanos) Bentley 10 series. That and the area where the metal receiver meets the wooden stock. This area is unique this this shotgun."

Max Deployment (talk) 16:02, 7 June 2015 (EDT)



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