Licence to Kill

From Internet Movie Firearms Database - Guns in Movies, TV and Video Games
Jump to: navigation, search
Licence to Kill (1989)

Licence to Kill is the 16th entry in the official James Bond film series and the final film to star Timothy Dalton as Agent 007. The 1989 sequel (which was the first not to bear the title of an Ian Fleming novel or short story) finds Bond on a personal mission to take down the drug lord responsible for an attack on his CIA friend Felix Leiter and his wife. The film co-stars Carey Lowell, Robert Davi, Benicio del Toro, and Wayne Newton.


The following weapons were used in the film Licence to Kill:

Contents


SPOILERS.jpg WARNING! THIS PAGE CONTAINS SPOILERS!

Pistols

Walther PPK

James Bond (Timothy Dalton) carries his usual Walther PPK as his weapon of choice throughout the film. However, this particular PPK is a WWII-era German Waffenamt variant (it should be noted that the PPK used in Licence To Kill was sourced from Stembridge Gun Rentals instead of Bapty and Co. since the movie was filmed entirely in the US and Mexico). This is most likely the same PPK Dalton had carried in the previous film, The Living Daylights.

Early Waffenamt marked Walther PPK. Note the differences: orange bakelite grips, lanyard ring, smaller rear sight, grooved top, and irregular front - 7.65x17mm Auto (.32 ACP)
A picture of the original Walther PPK prop used in the film as seen on Original Prop Blog
James Bond (Timothy Dalton) carries his usual Walther PPK as his weapon of choice throughout the film.
Bond searches Felix and Della's home with his PPK drawn.
Bond sets his PPK down next to Della.
Bond prepares to give his PPK to M at the Hemingway House, glibly remarking that it is a "farewell to arms".
Bond shows Pam his PPK in a shoulder holster.
A good view of the grip as Sanchez (Robert Davi) asks Bond why he carries a PPK.

Walther P5

During the tour of Sanchez' drug lab, Dario (Benicio del Toro) pulls a Walther P5 on Bond. A P5 was used by Bond in Octopussy.

Walther P5 - 9x19mm
Closeup of the P5 Dario sticks into Bond's back.
The rest of the demonstration continues without the others knowing about Dario confronting Bond.

Taurus PT92

During the pre-credits sequence, Felix Leiter (David Hedison) hands James Bond (Timothy Dalton) a Taurus PT92 "just in case". Bond uses it during the shootout against the henchmen that open fire, using it moments later to shoot the Jeep's left front tire. Milton Krest (Anthony Zerbe) uses a PT92 after Bond uses a spear gun to impale a diver and jumps off. The film's armorer states clearly its a Taurus PT92 and not a Beretta 92FS.

Early Model Taurus PT92AF - blued - 9x19mm
During the pre-credits sequence, Bond prepares to chamber the Taurus PT92 that Felix hands him.
Bond fires his PT92 at Sanchez's men from the Coast Guard helicopter.
Bond aims the PT92 at the jeep.
Milton Krest (Anthony Zerbe) fires the Taurus at Bond.

Heckler & Koch P9S

Braun (Guy De Saint Cyr) is armed with a Heckler & Koch P9S. He is later seen carrying it on the Wave Krest.

Heckler & Koch P9S - .45 ACP
Dario and Braun attack Della.
Braun (left) armed with a P9S searches the Wave Krest for Sanchez's money.

Beretta 950 Jetfire

Pam (Carey Lowell) carries a stainless steel Beretta 950 Jetfire as her sidearm throughout the film, giving one to Bond, and grabbing a spare one out of her purse when Bond leaves to check the hotel room. She also notably uses her Jetfire when she meets Professor Joe Butcher (Wayne Newton) when she goes to "study" with him.

Stainless Beretta 950B Jetfire - .25 ACP‎
Bond chambers a round into the Beretta Pam gives him from her leg holster.
Bond aims his Beretta at Q before realizing his identity.
Bond spins around with the Beretta when Pam enters the hotel room with her own Jetfire drawn.
Bond grabs Pam's Jetfire from its leg holster.
Bond intimidates Pam with her own Beretta Jetfire.
Pam grabs her Jetfire to intimidate Prof. Joe Butcher (Wayne Newton).
Pam demands the keys from Butcher.
CIA Agent Pam Bouvier (Carey Lowell) holds her Beretta. Note the "stovepipe" jam.

Browning Hi-Power

Col. Heller (Don Stroud) carries a Browning Hi-Power throughout the film. Another appears to be used by one of Sanchez's men.

Browning Hi Power Mark III - 9x19mm
Heller uses the HP to fire at the Chinese agent Loti.
Heller walks through with his Hi-Power drawn.
Browning on the right.
On the far left, what appears to be another Browning Hi-Power is held by one of Sanchez's men.

Revolvers

Ruger Security Six

Ed Killifer (Everett McGill) draws a stainless steel Ruger Security Six on Bond in Krest's warehouse.

Ruger Security Six with stainless steel finish - .357 Magnum
Killifer orders Bond to freeze.
Ed Killifer (Everett McGill) prepares to send Bond to the sharks.

Smith & Wesson Model 19

Bill, one of the security guards at Milton Krest's warehouse, carries a Smith & Wesson Model 19 revolver.

Smith & Wesson Model 19 Combat Magnum - .357 Magnum
A guard puts his revolver to Bond's head.
Bond is threatened by the guard.
Bond reaches for the guard's revolver before it gets shot away.

Smith & Wesson Model 19 (Snub)

Kwang (Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa) appears to pull a Smith & Wesson Model 19 Snub Nose when Heller and the military close in. Franz Sanchez (Robert Davi) also carries a Smith & Wesson Model 19 Snubnose that he fires at Kwang. The snubnose also appears to be the revolver carried by MI6 agents at the Hemingway House when Bond escapes.

Smith & Wesson Model 19 Snubnose - .357 Magnum
Kwang (Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa) appears to pull a Smith & Wesson Model 19 Snubnose when Heller and the military close in.
Franz Sanchez (Robert Davi) also carries a Smith & Wesson Model 19 Snubnose.
Sanchez sticks his snubnose into Kwang's neck.
Sanchez shoots at Kwang out of anger.
Bond kicks an agent holding the revolver.
The agent draws his revolver as M prevents him from shooting.

Smith & Wesson Model 15

When Bond hijacks the seaplane full of money, one of the pilots pulls a Smith & Wesson Model 15 on Bond and attempts to shoot him with it (instead shooting a package of money), but Bond knocks it out of the pilot's hand. Seen in the holsters of Florida Keys police officers.

Smith & Wesson Model 15 - .38 Special
The pilot shoots a package aboard his plane when trying to shoot Bond.

Smith & Wesson Model 66

Dario (Benicio del Toro) grabs a Smith & Wesson Model 66 from one of his henchmen in the bar and uses it to fire at Bond and Pam as they get away on the boat. These appear to be the revolvers carried by Miami police officers as well.

Smith & Wesson Model 66 - .357 Magnum
Dario aims his revolver at Bond. Note the massive hole blown in the wall by Pam's Mossberg 500 Cruiser.
Dario (Benicio del Toro) fires his revolver.
Revolvers seen carried by Miami police officers.

Submachine Guns

Heckler & Koch HK94A3 (Chopped and Converted)

Many of Sanchez's henchmen are armed with H&K HK94A3s chopped and converted to resemble MP5A3 submachine guns. Dario (Benicio del Toro) carries one while in the jeep in the pre-credits sequence. The guard (Carl Ciarfalio) at Milton Krest's warehouse carries one, as do several of Sanchez's men during the final car chase. The majority of the film was produced in both the US and Mexico and the production crew sourced their weapons from Stembridge Gun Rentals instead of Bapty and Co (the traditional armorers for the James Bond movies).

The "Fake MP5", the Heckler & Koch HK94A3 Converted to full auto fire, shortened barrel and added third firing position on trigger pack - 9x19mm. This version was used in many films during the 1980s and 1990s.
Dario jumps out of the Jeep, carrying his HK94A3.
The warehouse guard (Carl Ciarfalio) loads a fresh magazine into his HK94A3.
The warehouse guard searches for Bond.
One of Krest's men looks for Bond with his HK94A3.
Krest's men open fire with their converted HK's.
One of Sanchez's men watches Bond and Lupe go off in Sanchez's boat.
Sanchez's men with their converted HK's.

Micro UZI

Perez (Alejandro Bracho) and Sanchez (Robert Davi) himself use Micro Uzis. Interestingly, in the truck chase, if you listen to the bullet impacts, they plink out some phrases from the James Bond theme song. Sanchez uses his micro Uzi to "cut overhead" after Truman-Lodge (Anthony Starke) sarcastically congratulated him on an "eighty-million dollar write-off".

Micro Uzi - 9x19mm
Perez fires a micro uzi over the Jeep's windshield.
Perez, holding a Micro Uzi, finds his hidden money aboard the Wave Krest. The UZI appears to hang from a Galco shoulder rig.
Sanchez takes a Micro Uzi from the case containing the Stinger.
Sanchez (Robert Davi) fires his Micro Uzi from the car.
"Then I guess it's time to start cutting overhead." Sanchez (Robert Davi) fires his Micro Uzi after Truman-Lodge (Anthony Starke) sarcastically congratulated him on an "eighty-million dollar write-off".
Sanchez realizes his Micro Uzi is empty during the tanker chase.

Assault Rifles

Colt Commando Carbine

Felix Leiter and DEA agents Hawkins (Grand L. Bush) and Mullens (Rafer Johnson) during the pre-credits sequence, are armed with Colt Commando Carbines.

Colt Commando - 5.56x45mm
Felix and Mullens (Rafer Johnson) run from the helicopter with Commandos.
DEA Agent Mullens (Rafer Johnson) holds the rifle.
DEA Agent Hawkins (Grand L. Bush) with the rifle.
Felix fires his Commando at Sanchez's men.

Colt M16A1

M16A1 rifles are held by DEA agents and SWAT officers that escort the prison van carrying Sanchez. The soldiers in the fictional country of Isthmus also carry M16A1 rifles. These rifles are fitted with M16A2 handguards. What appears to be a scoped M16 is used by an MI6 agent when Bond escapes from custody at the Hemingway House.

M16A1 with A2 handguards - 5.56x45mm
Miami SWAT officers hold M16A1 rifles fitted with A2 handguards.
Three soldiers walk through Isthmus City with M16s. The guard standing closest to the red door on the left is carrying a Remington 870.
The Chinese agent Loti (Diana Lee Hsu) fires an M16A1 taken off one of the Isthmus soldiers.
An Isthmus soldier walks through the bombed out Chinese HQ with his M16. The filled in barrel makes this a prop rifle.
What appears to be a scoped M16 is used by an MI6 agent when Bond escapes from custody at the Hemingway House.

Galil AR

An IMI Galil is seen in the hands of an Isthmus soldier.

IMI Galil Select Fire AR rifle - 5.56mm
The rifle is seen in the hands of an Isthmus soldier.

Shotguns

Remington 870

Ed Killifer (Everett McGill), the DEA agent that Sanchez bribed to get him out of custody, carries a Remington 870 shotgun in the prison van, using it to knock the driver out and take control of the van and run it off a bridge. They were also seen carried by Bank of Isthmus City security guards during the scene that introduces Truman Lodge.

Remington 870 - 12 gauge
Ed Killifer (Everett McGill) handles the Remington 870.
Killifer knocks out the van driver.

Mossberg 500 Cruiser

CIA agent Pam Bouvier (Carey Lowell) uses a sawed-off Mossberg 500 Cruiser during the bar fight. It blows a hole in the wall somehow big enough for a human to fit through.

Mossberg 500 "Cruiser" - 12 gauge.
Pam shows Bond her Mossberg 500.
Pam pushes her Mossberg into Dario's sensitive areas.
Pam orders Bond around while brandishing her Mossberg Cruiser.

Machine Guns

Browning M1919A4

A Browning M1919A4 is seen mounted on an M5 Stuart tank ordered to open fire on a hideout.

Browning M1919A4 on a pedestal mount - .30-06
On the left, a Browning M1919A4 is seen mounted on an Stuart tank ordered to open fire on a hideout.

Launchers

FIM-43 Redeye

What are referred to as "Stingers" in the film appear to be FIM-43 Redeye launchers in reality. During the final car chase, Perez (Alejandro Bracho), one of Sanchez's henchmen, attempts to use the FIM-43 Redeye to try and kill Bond, but Bond dodges the missile by tilting his tanker on its left side wheels. Sanchez later attempts to use one to take down Pam's plane . The "Stinger" is incorrectly portrayed as a conventional rocket launcher, with the ability to be reloaded with rockets (the actual Stinger system is a single use weapon). This launcher also is erroneously depicted as a standard hard-launch missile launcher, instead of a soft-launch (where the missile is pneumatically ejected a safe distance and then ignites its motor).

FIM-43 Redeye - 70mm
Dario packs up the Redeye.
One of Sanchez's men pulls out the Redeye.
Perez aims the Redeye at Bond's tanker. Notice the man standing behind him in the grey shirt - not a good idea.
Perez flips the safety catch off.
Firing the launcher. The actual Stinger system has a massive backblast, which would have likely badly burned anyone standing that close behind it. This launcher also is erroneously depicted as a standard hard-launch missile launcher, instead of a soft-launch (where the missile is pneumatically ejected a safe distance and then ignites its motor).
The henchmen watch as Bond tilts his tanker on two wheels.
Sanchez later attempts to use one to take down Pam's plane.

Other

Spear Gun

A spear gun is used by Bond and Krest's men during the plane chase in the Florida Keys.

Bond uses a spear gun to waterski behind a drug plane.

"Signature Camera Gun"

Q makes Bond a customized Camera Gun to assassinate Sanchez, which can only be fired by him thanks to the fingerprint recognition mechanism built into the pistol grip (explaining why the Chinese Intelligence agents cannot get it to work). Q identified the gun's "film" as .220 high-velocity. The palm print identification in the grip was also used in the Bond film Skyfall.

Q shows Bond the dismantled camera gun in its case.
Q identified the gun's "film" as .220 high-velocity.
Closeup of the grip
Bond imprints the camera gun so only he can fire it. This kind of security measure was also seen in Skyfall.
Bond fires the weapon.
The camera gun on the ground
One of the Chinese agents tries to shoot Bond with his own gun.

See Also

EON Productions Sean Connery Dr. No (1962)  •  From Russia with Love (1963)  •  Goldfinger (1964)  •  Thunderball (1965)  •  You Only Live Twice (1967)  •  Diamonds Are Forever (1971)
George Lazenby On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)
Roger Moore Live and Let Die (1973)  •  The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)  •  The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)  •  Moonraker (1979)  •  For Your Eyes Only (1981) Octopussy (1983)  •  A View to a Kill (1985)
Timothy Dalton The Living Daylights (1987)  •  Licence to Kill (1989)
Pierce Brosnan GoldenEye (1995)  •  Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)  •  The World Is Not Enough (1999)  •  Die Another Day (2002)
Daniel Craig Casino Royale (2006)  •  Quantum of Solace (2008)  •  Skyfall (2012)
Non-EON films Barry Nelson Casino Royale (1954)
David Niven Casino Royale (1967)
Sean Connery Never Say Never Again (1983)
GoldenEye 007 (1997)  •  The World Is Not Enough (2000)  •  NightFire (2002)  •
Quantum of Solace (2008)  •  GoldenEye 007 (2010)  •  Blood Stone (2010)  •  007: Legends (2012)


Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Categories
Special
Sponsors
Social Media
Toolbox