Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, The

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The following guns were used in the film The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.


All the guns in this film were supplied by Aldo Uberti Inc. of Italy.

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (1966)

Contents





Colt 1851 Navy (cartridge conversion)

Blondie (Clint Eastwood) carries a Colt 1851 Navy revolver with a loading gate cartridge conversion kit (which is actually historically correct-first conversions were made in 1859,and .38 Short Colt was invented at the beginning of the Civil War) throughout the film, his being outfitted with wooden grips inlaid with silver rattlesnakes, with which all his revolvers were fitted in the Leone trilogy. It is based on the same grips used by Clint as Rowdy Yates in the television series Rawhide. Tuco (Eli Wallach) also carries a Cartridge converted Navy, his being fitted with a lanyard loop, which instead of a holster, is stuck in his pocket (because Eli Wallach had trouble holstering a revolver without looking at the holster.) Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef) also used a Navy Cartridge to murder a sickly old man towards the beginning of the film, firing it through his pillow. He keeps this Navy when serving in the Union, but carries a Remington 1858 for his own use. Throughout the film, it becomes obvious that if they have a cartridge revolver, they are going to fire it in the scene. In any other scene, the revolvers change to unloaded percussion models (with the exception of Blondie's).

Colt Navy 1851 with loading gate cartridge conversion with silver snake grips. This is a reproduction model from Cimmaron Arms.
Angel Eyes fires his Colt Navy Cartridge into the old man, covering his face with a pillow.
Blondie fires his Colt Navy Cartridge at the men trying to arrest Tuco. Note how quick he is, none have even hit the ground yet.
Close up of Bondie's Navy after dispatching the assassins.
After piecing together several Navys, Tuco listens to see how well the cylinder divots fit with the cylinder lock.
Tuco threatens the gun store owner with the Colt Navy. Note how the hammer has been modified to fire centerfire rounds instead of striking percussion caps.
Blondie cleans his Colt Navy. Blondie must shoot his gun quite often to get it so dirty.
Blondie sleeps with his hand on his Colt Navy. Note the silver inlaid snake grips.
Blondie: One, two, three, four, five, and six. Six, the perfect number.
Angel Eyes: I thought three was the perfect number.
Blondie: I've got six more bullets in my gun.
Blondie fires his Colt Navy during the graveyard standoff.

This side-by-side shows how Tuco's revolver switches from a cartridge revolver to a percussion revolver in the scene. A goof also worth noting is how his revolver is capable of firing under water, while he is in the bathtub. Well, it wasn't in the water per-se, just under the bubbles.

Tuco with his Navy. To the left, it is a cartridge revolver, which he fires to kill the one armed assassin. To the right, it is a percussion, because he doesn't have to fire it.

Colt 1851 Navy Percussion

A percussion Colt 1851 Navy is seen used by Tuco (Eli Wallach) when firing the gun is not required or he must point the gun at a fellow actor.

Colt Navy 1851 .36 caliber percussion.
Tuco holds his Percussion Navy to the Inn owner.
"There are two kinds of spurs, my friend. Those that come in by the door.... and those that come in by the window."
Close up of Tuco's percussion Navy.
Tuco prepares to kill Blondie with his Colt Navy.
Closeup of Tuco's Colt Navy during the standoff.
Tuco fans his Colt Navy during the standoff, to discover it is empty.

Remington 1858 New Army

Angel Eyes/Sentenza (Lee Van Cleef) carries a Remington 1858 New Army as his personal sidearm. It seems it's dual toned, with a blued or black cylinder and barrel, and a grey cylinder housing. When not carrying his 1858, he is carrying his Union issued Colt Navy. He uses it to kill Stevens, on behalf of Baker, and moments later, Stevens oldest son. After that, he's not seen firing it again, instead using his colt Navy. It is a somewhat notable goof that he keeps a cartridge belt despite using a percussion revolver. Also, a common continuity error is the that the gun is loaded or unloaded with percussion caps.

Remington Model 1858 in .44 caliber.
Angel Eyes' Remington 1858 is seen in his holster as he talks with the half soldier.
Angle Eyes sleeps with his 1858 near by. Note how he keeps a useless cartridge belt.
Side by Side showing how his Remington goes from being unloaded to loaded during the final standoff.
A wounded Angel Eyes after the standoff armed with his '58.

Winchester 1866 "Yellow Boy" (mocked up as a Henry 1860)

Blondie (Clint Eastwood) uses a Winchester 1866 "Yellow Boy" rifle with a side folding scope. He is prominently seen using it as a means to con law officials by giving up Tuco, a wanted criminal, for a bounty. He then uses the rifle to shoot the rope before Tuco is hanged, and they split the reward. He also is seen with it when a man named "Shorty" is to be hung, but Tuco doesn't allow him to shoot the rope, and poor Shorty hangs. A bounty hunter is also seen using one to shoot out Tuco's horse towards the beginning of the film. It should be noted that while the gun is anachronistic to the time, it is made to look like a Henry 1860 rifle by removing the wooden forend. The dead giveaways are the loading gate on the right side, the lack of a magazine tube loading break switch, and the lack of slits in the mag tube which allows the user to see bullets left in the gun.

Winchester 1866 "Yellow Boy". Model in film has forend removed and has a side folding scope.
Henry 1860 .44 Rimfire, the gun being replicated by the Yellow Boy.
A Bounty Hunter shoots out Tuco's horse with a Winchester 1866.
Blondie fires his Winchester 1866. Note the loading gate on the right, helping tell it is a Yellow Boy and not a Henry.
Blondie fires a second shot after only skimming the rope with the first.
Blondie prepares to shoot out Shorty's rope. Note the side-folding scope.

Sharps 1874

As Tuco hangs from a rope in the graveyard, Blondie is seen firing a Sharps 1874 rifle with a ladder elevated sight. While it could be an older, more accurate depiction of a Sharps rifle for the time, it is most likely a cartridge model 1874 so it could fire blanks, making it yet another anachronism.

Sharps 1874 with ladder sights and octagonal barrel .45-70.
Blondie fires the Sharps 1874 rifle.

Colt 1860 Army

One of the Bounty Hunters trying to capture Tuco is armed with a Colt 1860 Army revolver.

Colt 1860 Army .44 caliber.
A Bounty Hunter approaches Tuco with the Colt Army.

Remington 1858 "Cattleman's Carbine"

One of Angel Eye's thugs tries to shoot Tuco with a Remington 1858 "Cattleman's Carbine", a rifle version of the Remington 1858 revolver before being shot by Blondie. This gun actually appears to be one of the few percussion guns actually fired in the film as opposed to cartridge guns.

Uberti copy of Remington 1858 "Cattleman's Carbine" .44 caliber.
The shooter cocks his Cattleman's Carbine.
Note how lead balls are loaded in the Cattleman.
As the camera pans to the right side of the gun, note how two chambers have no lead balls packed in. Those are the chambers loaded with blank shot.


Springfield Model 1863

The Union and Confederate soldiers are seen mainly armed with Springfield Model 1863 rifles throughout the film.

Union Springfield 1863 .58 caliber Mini-ball.
Union soldiers guarding the Confederate POWs are seen armed with Springfield 1863s through the scope of the Union General's.
Union soldiers guard the Confederate POWs with Springfield 1863s.
Union soldiers execute a Confederate spy with possible 1863 rifles.
Confederate soldiers march through town with possible 1863 rifles slung over their shoulders.

Colt Gatling Gun

Union soldiers are seen utilizing Colt Gatling Guns during the battle scene, some fitted with 20 round vertical magazines, some fitted with 100 round drum magazines.

Colt Gatling Gun 1865.
Close up shot of Gatling Gun muzzle to right.
A Gatling Gun fitted with a 100 round drum is seen during a long camera pan.
A Union Soldier fires a Gatling Gun fitted with a 20 round magazine.
A soldier fires a Gatling Gun.
A Gatling Gun is seen with a 100 round drum.

Explosives

Many reports have said the movie messed up by putting Dynamite in a film taking place in 1862 since Dynamite was invented in 1867 but upon closer inspection, they are more likely black powder charges wrapped in paper and not Dynamite.

Tuco fastens a blackpowder charge to the bridge.

Dahlgren Cannon

What appears to be a Dalhgren Cannon is used by the Union during the battle scene.

The Union soldiers fire the Dahlgen at the Confederates.

Howitzer Cannon

Howitzer Cannons are seen several times during the battle scene and Blondie (Clint Eastwood) uses one to fire on Tuco as he attempts to run away on his horse.

A Howitzer Cannon is seen when the men look out at the bridge.
Blondie fires a Howitzer at Tuco as he flees on a horse, this model with octagonal muzzle.

Mountain Howitzer

A Brass finish model of the Howitzer is seen used by the union soldiers during the battle scene.

Union soldiers seen manning a Mountain Howitzer.
Union soldiers fire the Mountain Howitzer.

Sled-Base Cauldron Mortar

Cauldron shaped Mortars mounted on sled-bases are used mainly by the Union soldiers throughout the film, most prominently seen used during the battle scene, and one manages to interrupt Tuco from hanging Blondie when a Mortar ball destroys the floor, allowing Blondie to escape.

The barrel of a Sled-Base Mortar before firing a round to interrupt Blondie's hanging.
The Union soldiers fire the Cauldron Mortars.

Galand Revolver

Tuco inspects a Galand Revolver in the gunstore. It is an anachronism for this gun to be in Tuco's hands as the gun was invented in 1868, this film takes place in 1862.

Galand 12mm with lever open.
Tuco plays with a Galand in the gunshop.

Victor Collete Pepperbox

Tuco inspects a Victor Collete Pepperbox revolver in the gunshop, apparently disliking it for its smell.

Victor Collete Pepperbox.
Tuco picks up the Victor Collete Pepperbox, and unfolds the trigger.

Bodeo M1889

Tuco picks up an Italian Bodeo M1889 revolver before discarding it.
Bodeo M1889 - 10.4 x 22mm Italian
Tuco inspects a Bodeo - note lack of trigger guard and locking mechanism for folding trigger.

Unknown Revolvers

On the table in the gunshop, a few revolvers are difficult to identify, and require a keener eye than mine.

Unknown Revolver circled in red.
Unknown Revolver circled in red.

Allen & Thurber Pepperbox

After Tuco horribly throws all the guns off the table, an Allen & Thurber Pepperbox with a ring trigger becomes visible.

Allen & Thurber Pepperbox revolver.
Allen & Thurber pistol circled in red.

Sawed-Off Shotgun/Howdah

Some type of Sawed-Off double-barreled gun is seen on the table in the gun shop, perhaps a sawed-off shotgun or more likely a Howdah .577 pistol.

Howdah .577 pistol.
Possible Howdah circled in red.

Remington Rolling Block Cavalry

A pistol version of the Remington Rolling Block, known as the Cavalry model is seen on the table in the gunshop.

Remington Rolling Block Cavalry .50 caliber.
A Remington Rolling Block Cavalry is visible when Tuco knocks the pistols off the table.

See Also

Dollars/Man With No Name Trilogy



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