Bergmann MP35/I

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Bergmann MP35/I left side - 9x19mm
Bergmann MP35/I right side - 9x19mm

The Bergmann MP 35 (also known as Bergmann MP 34, MP 34/1 and MP 35/1) was a German submachine gun, which was used during the Second World War, especially by German police and the Waffen-SS. Emil Bergmann, son of Theodor Bergmann, developed the submachine gun in the early 1930s. During development, there were two different models, the Bergmann-Maschinenpistole (BMP-32) and the Bergmann-Maschinenkarabiner 32 (BMK-32) with a longer barrel. The BMP-32 is essentially identical to the model MP 34 (not to be confused with the Steyr MP34). Until the mid-1930s, the submachine gun was slightly modified to the models MP 34/1, MP 35 (not to be confused with the Erma EMP-35) and MP 35/1. The variants differ only by smaller differences. So there were always models with different barrel lengths and calibers and in the weapons produced later small structural changes in order to reduce production costs.

The Treaty of Versailles prohibited German companies from developing and producing submachine guns. To circumvent this ban, production was outsourced from Germany, as was the case with the Steyr MP34, for example. In addition, the company lacked production capacity to produce the weapons in mass production. From 1932 the weapon was manufactured under license by the Danish company Schultz & Larsen on behalf of Bergmann. This submachine gun was officially adopted by the Danish armed forces in the 9 mm caliber Bergmann Bayard. Also, the Swedish military bought a few specimens in the caliber 9 mm Parabellum, probably for experimental purposes. Weapons were also made for the calibers 7.63 mm Mauser, 7.65 mm Parabellum, 9 mm Mauser Export and .45 ACP. Walther Arms received end of 1934 an order for the production of the Bergmann machine pistols and began with the series production. From 1935 the submachine guns were also manufactured in Karlsruhe by the Junker and Ruh AG. Outside of Germany and Denmark, the Bergmann MPi was used mainly in South America, China, Ethiopia and during the Spanish Civil War. By 1945, a total of about 40 000 pieces have been produced.

The Bergmann MP was blowback operated, selective-fired weapon which fired from open bolt. Unusual feature of Bergmann was the cocking handle, which was placed at the rear of the receiver. To tighten the lock, the weapon has a bolt action. Before the first shot, it must be pulled back upwards like a rifle and then closed again. During firing, the bolt remains in the closed position. This design method has some advantages and disadvantages: The great advantage is that the weapon, except the ejection window, has no openings and thus is reliably protected against dirt from the outside. The disadvantages are the unconventional and comparatively complicated operation of the weapon and the high costs incurred by the time-consuming production. The submachine guns have a manual locking lever on the left side of the case, which can block the trigger and shutter. There is also a built-in firing pin safety. The firing pin is not firmly fixed to the bolt head, but is not moved forward until the bolt is fully closed by a lever on the bolt to ignite the cartridge in the cartridge chamber. The magazine shaft is attached to the right side of the weapon, which is unusual and makes the weapon easily distinguishable from similar submachine guns. When shooting, a specific construction of the trigger can be used to choose between single fire and continuous fire. If you only press the upper part of the trigger, you shoot into single fire. If you press the lower part of the trigger, an additional lever behind the trigger is activated and the gun fires in continuous fire. The aiming device is a curve sight, which can be adjusted for a distance of 50 to 1000 meters.


Contents


Specifications

(1932-1945) Germany

  • Type: Submachine Gun
  • Caliber: 9 × 19 mm, 9 mm Bergmann-Bayard, 7,63 × 25 mm, 7,65 mm Parabellum, 9 mm Mauser Export, .45 ACP
  • Weight: 4.24 kg (unloaded) (9.3 lb)
  • Length: 840 mm (33.1 in)
  • Barrel length: 200 mm (7.9 in)
  • Capacity: 20-, 24- or 32-round detachable box magazine
  • Fire Modes: Semi-auto / full-auto

The Bergmann MP35/I and variants can be seen in the following films, television series, video games, and anime used by the following actors:

Film

Title Actor Character Note Date
Fire and Ice (Le combat dans l'île) Jean-Louis Trintignant Clément Lesser 1962
Terrorist
Monsieur Gangster Horst Frank Theo 1963
Mac Ronay Bastien
The Great Spy Chase (Les Barbouzes) Charles Millot Hans Müller 1964
Who's Got the Black Box (La route de Corinthe) Maurice Ronet Dex 1967
One of Khalidès men
State of Siege (État de Siège) A guerrilla fighter 1972
Borsalino and Co. Siffredi and Volpone henchmen 1974
Cuba Cuban guerillas Seen in documentary footage 1979
The Dirty Dozen: The Next Mission Lee Marvin Major John Reisman 1985
Ken Wahl Louis Valentine
Fantômas se déchaîne Henri Attal Bodyguard of Fantômas 1985
The guards of the factory
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade German soldiers 1989
Pan's Labyrinth Spanish Maquis 2006
Miami Vice Guard 2006

Video Games

Game Title Appears as Notation Release Date
The Order: 1886 'M85 Automatisch' Uses a drum magazine from the Mondragón Rifle and charging handle from Bergmann MP18. 2015



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