Bullitt

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Bullitt (1968)

Bullitt is a 1968 crime thriller starring Steve McQueen as Frank Bullitt, an SFPD lieutenant who investigates the circumstances surrounding the attempted hit on an informant that he was protecting. The film, which was directed by Peter Yates, is best remembered for its amazing car chase along the streets of San Francisco.


The following weapons were used in the film Bullitt:

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SPOILERS.jpg WARNING! THIS PAGE CONTAINS SPOILERS!


Colt Diamondback

SFPD Lt. Frank Bullitt (Steve McQueen) carries as his sidearm a Colt Diamondback snubnose revolver. According to the source[1], the Colt Diamondback snubnose that is carried by Steve McQueen was fitted with grips from a Colt Detective Special. (See the Colt Detective Special photo on this page.)

Colt Diamondback Snubnose Revolver – .38 Special
Bullitt (Steve McQueen) pulls out his Colt Diamondback just before he takes down Ross (Pat Renella).
Bullitt (Steve McQueen) shoots Ross (Pat Renella).
The crowd runs for cover.
Bullitt (Steve McQueen) approaches Ross's (Pat Renella) corpse.
Bullitt's Diamondback in its holster.

Colt Detective Special

It appears that the other two detectives who work for Bullitt, Delgetti (Don Gordon) and Stanton (Carl Reindel), carry the Colt Detective Special (either the 1st or 2nd generation with the exposed ejector rod).

Colt Detective Special – .38 Special
The injured Detective Stanton (Carl Reindel) after being shot by the hit team sent to kill the fake Ross that Bullitt and his men are protecting. Notice the Colt Detective Special laying on the floor next to him.

Smith & Wesson Model 58

There is one scene in which one can see a revolver in a motorcycle officer's holster with either fake ivory (i.e. plastic) grips or genuine ivory grips.Target grips as well. Judging from the grip's shape, it possible that it is a Smith & Wesson Model 58 revolver. For several years, the S.F.P.D. authorized officers to carry the S&W Model 58 .41 magnum. The Model 58 was manufactured between 1964 - 1977. The S.F.P.D. gave its full cooperation to the production in the spring of 1968 and it's plausible that the two officers were the real thing using their actual equipment.

Smith & Wesson Model 58 .41 Magnum.
S.F.P.D. motorcycle officer with Smith & Wesson Model 58 in his holster

Colt M1911A1

Johnny Ross (Pat Renella) uses a Colt M1911A1 at the end of the movie when Bullitt corners him at the airport.

World War II issued Colt M1911A1 Pistol - .45 ACP
Johnny Ross (Pat Renella) aims at Bullitt with his 1911.
Johnny Ross (Pat Renella) pulls out his 1911 in the airport.

Winchester Model 1897

The two hitmen (Bill Hickman and Paul Genge) who are seen shooting Ross (Felice Orlandi) and later shoot at Bullitt from the Charger during the famous car chase use a Winchester Model 1897. The Model 1897 was designed by John Browning and had an exposed hammer like a lever action rifle. The version used by the blonde-haired hitman (Paul Genge) is what is known as a “takedown” model. After he shoots Ross, the shotgun is seen taken down when he separates the barrel/magazine from the receiver. It appears the hitman’s model has had the barrel cut down to at least 18". It also appears to have a full stock. The left side of the receiver is marked "U.S.". The shotgun appears to be a 12 gauge as red shells are loaded, but there is no way to make certain of its actual gauge.

Winchester Model 1897 - 12 gauge. This is an imported copy of the non-take down version of the Winchester 1897 Shotgun (a Norinco 97W shotgun, imported by IAC).
A hitman (Paul Genge) cocks his shotgun after shooting a cop. Prepares to shoot the impersonator (Felice Orlandi).
The hitman (Paul Genge) pulls the trigger, hitting "Ross".
The hitman (Paul Genge) disassembles the Winchester after shooting the Ross impersonator fatally.
The hitman (Paul Genge) loads the Winchester during the famous car chase.
A hitman (Paul Genge) takes aim from the Charger at Bullitt.
The hitman (Paul Genge) fires.


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